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The School of Science launched fully fledged degree programmes in January 2006 through the following academic departments:

 

1. Department of Applied Biology

Bachelor of Science in Applied Biology

Bachelor of Science in Applied Biology with options in Microbiology and Biotechnology

The B.Sc. Applied Biology is a four year degree program designed such that the graduating candidates will acquire the following skills. A student completing the Applied Biology programmes will have an understanding of a broad range of Biological courses, how to carry out scientific investigation by means of a research project. Students should acquire an ability to critically analyze a variety of experimental results from different sources and determine their merit, strength and validity. Build an ability to identify and propose solutions to biological problems around them. solutions to chemical and related problems.

 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

For admission into the Applied Biology degree programme, a minimum of two principal passes in Chemistry and Biology at Secondary School Advanced level is needed from any of the A-level combination Government sponsored students are selected by the Rwanda National Examinations Council.

Privately sponsored students should apply directly to the Institute's office of the Registrar.

Information on fees and other admission requirements can be obtained from www.admissions.ur.ac.rw

 

PROGRAMME CONTENT

Year 1, Semester I: International Computer Driving Licence, Cell Biology, Invertebrate Zoology, Mathematics for life science I, General physics I, General chemistry, Study skills, General English

Semester II, Genetics, Cordate zoology, Introductory botany, Organic chemistry I, Plant physiology, General English,

Year 2, Semester I: Vertebrate physiology, General microbiology, General entomology, Biochemistry I, Applied probability and statistics, Ecology, English for science and technology

Semester II, English for science and technology, General Parasitology, Developmental biology, Environmental microbiology, Microbial diversity, Taxonomy of higher plants, Biochemistry II

Year 3, Semester I: Biostatistics, Microbial physiology, Immunology, Microbial morphology and cellular structure, English for academic purposes

Semester II: Recombinant DNA technology, Quantitative and population genetics, Proteins and enzymes, Applied entomology, Food microbiology and food borne diseases, Symbiotic microbiology

Year 4: Biotechnology, Semester I, Animal and plant tissue culture, Bioinformatics, Plant biotechnology, Industrial attachment, Research project on biotechnology I

Semester II: Animal biotechnology, Advanced recombinant DNA Technology, Entrepreneurship development, Biosafety bioethics and biopolicy, Immunogenetics,Research project on biotechnology II Year IV, Microbiology, Semester I, Bacteriology and mycology, Virology, Protozoology and vector control, Industrial attachment, Research project on microbiology I Semester II, Industrial microbiology, agricultural microbiology, Entrepreneurship development, Epidemiology of infectious pathogens, Tropical diseases, Research project on microbiology II.

 

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

A. Knowledge and Understanding

At the end of the programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

1. Basic biological concepts (from molecular, cellular, to species, ecosystems and landscapes)

2. The fundamental sciences and disciplines that support deeper understanding of and foundation in biology: physics, math and chemistry.

3. Understand the history of science, the future of scientific advances for problem solving, and the ethics and policies involved.

4. Principles of evolution.

5. Principles of biotechnology, microbiology, conservation biology and biodiversity, including interdisciplinary aspects (e.g., role of social and political sciences)

6. Cellular, microbial, animal and plant diversity, taxonomy and functioning.

B. Cognitive/Intellectual skills/Application of Knowledge

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

1. Describe the distribution of biological diversity in Rwanda, and the value of, policies and socio-economic factors affecting biological diversity.

2. Develop a research program to solve an environmental or biological problem

3. Apply theoretical concepts in the interpretation of biological systems – their function and structure.

4. Define the most urgent research needs in biology

5. Apply biological concepts and theories learned in classes to biological and environmental problems and needs in Rwanda

6. Interpret lab experiment and field or data collection results, data analyses and present results and conclusions in a clear, concise manner

C. Communication/ICT/Numeracy/Analytic Techniques/Practical Skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

1. Identify the components and functions of cells, organs, organisms, species, and biological systems (e.g., populations, communities, ecosystems, landscapes)

2. Identify careers in biological sciences

3. Use scientific apparatus and equipment, both lab and field, with skill and confidence

analyse data quantitatively and qualitatively.

4. Ability to synthesize and present material orally in a concise and interesting manner

D. General transferable skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

1. Interact with professionals from their field

2. Carry out laboratory or field work effectively and professionally

3. Work effectively in groups

4. Use with ease computers, software, and the internet

5. Locate and synthesize bibliographic material

6. Write research proposals, including design and collecting and analysing data

 

 

2. Department of Applied Chemistry

Bachelor of Science in Applied Chemistry

Bachelor of Science in Applied Chemistry with options in Biochemistry and Environmental Chemistry

The main objective of the new BSc Chemistry Programme is to improve scientific and technological researches which are in conformity with the goals of UR, 2020 Government vision. By studying this programme, students will not only acquire the fundamental skills necessary to be professional chemist, but also the transferable skills of generalist in sciences, computing, report writing and data analysis. This programme prepares graduates to be high-calibre researcher chemists with a thorough knowledge of both chemistry and related technologies. Many are employed each year in research and quality control institutions, brewery, lemonade, food, paint, texture, essential oils, natural compounds, medicinal plants and all other chemical industries. They are also employed in as diverse as environmental control and protection. Due to the high knowledge they have in Chemistry, BSc chemists can also employed in the area of national education after completing a module on pedagogy. The University of Rwanda BSc chemistry can be summarized as follows: The first two years are common. From the third year to fourth year, students chose between three options, Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, which one they want to follow with. With organic chemistry, students principally acquire notions on traditional and innovative synthetic chemistry, with the objective to design, prepare, and evaluate biological active compounds. They also learn different physico-chemical methods of separation, identification and analysis in order to be able to control quality of different chemical mixtures, foods and so on. In Biochemistry, students will develop knowledge on a wide range of scientific topics, including stem cell research, genetic research, immunology, pharmacology, forensics, cancer research, environmental science and food science while in Environmental chemistry, students acquire notions for control and protecting Environment. They learn not only different methods for water, air and soil quality analysis, but also discuss on the causes of Environmental degradation and propose solutions to limit them.

 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

For admission into the Applied Chemistry degree programme, a minimum of two principal passes in Chemistry and Biology at Secondary School Advanced level is needed from any of the A-level combination.

Government sponsored students are selected by the Rwanda National Examinations Council. Privately sponsored students should apply directly to the Institute's office of the Registrar.

Information on fees and other admission requirements can be obtained from www.admissions.ur.ac.rw

 

PROGRAMME CONTENT

Year 1: Languages ( English / French), General Physics I, Computer literacy, Foundation skills, General Chemistry, Languages ( English / French), General Physics I, Analytical I, General Biology, Organic Chemistry I, Analytical chemistry II, Computer programming, Mathematics II, General Physics II, Cell biology

Year 2: Mathematics, Inorganic chemistry I, Organic chemistry II, Physical chemistry I, Probability/statistics, Inorganic chemistry II, Organic chemistry III, Physical chemistry II, Bioinorganic Chemistry.

Year 3:

Biochemistry Option.Organic chemistry IV, Biomolecules, Analytical instrumentation, Physical chemistry III, Cell and its environment, Basic metabolism, Organic chemistry V, Industrial chemistry I, Advanced metabolism, Protein and Enzymes.

Environmental Option.Organic chemistry IV, Biomolecules,Analytical instrumentation, Physical chemistry III, Atmospheric chemistry, Natural water and its treatment, Organic chemistry V, Industrial chemistry I, Soil chemistry, Solid waste treatment,

Year 4:

Biochemistry Option.Organic chemistry V1, Industrial chemistry II, Proteins and enzymes II, DNA Chemistry, Industrial attachment Project

Environmental Option. Organic chemistry V1, Industrial chemistry II,Air pollution, Water pollution and wastewater treatment, Industrial attachment, Project.

 

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

A. Knowledge and Understanding;

At the end of the programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

1. English as tool of communication and research

2. Major aspects of chemical terminology, nomenclature, chemical reactions and convention units

3. The theory of quantum mechanics and their application to description of the structure and properties of atoms and molecules

4. The principles of thermodynamics, kinetics and their application in chemistry

5. The synthesis and properties of transition metal complexes including ligand design

6. The structures and properties of solid state materials

7. Stereochemistry, functional groups and reactions in organic molecules

8. Properties and utilities of macromolecules

9. Techniques of chemical separation, chemical analysis and structure elucidation, including spectroscopy

10. The properties of natural, heterocyclic and organometallic compounds

11. Living organism, characterization and its needs

12. Environmental friendly use and protection

13. Pure and human Sciences

14. Different methods of sampling, data analysis and data use

15. Innovative spirt for job creation

B. Cognitive/Intellectual skills/Application of Knowledge

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

16. Use English language in research, writing and communication

17. Apply chemical knowledge and skills to find solution to the problems raised by society

18. Identify pertinent topics of research and write proposal for research funds

19. Proceed to further studies in specialised areas of chemistry

20. Conduct a research in either organic, biochemistry or environmental chemistry as well and under minimum supervision

21. Establish a link between all life sciences and its complementarity

C. Communication/ICT/Numeracy/Analytic Techniques/Practical Skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

22. Use a range of software to present a scientific research topics

23. Communicate in a well structured and coherent form to various audiences

24. Analyse different chemical samples and well discuss results obtained

25. Work in the analytic and synthesis chemistry laboratories as well

26. Report on the chemical quality of samples

27. Use other life science to well understand chemistry phenomena 

 

 

3. Department of Applied Physics

Bachelor of Science in Applied Physics

Bachelor of Science in Applied Physics with options in Material Physics and Renewable Energy

The B.Sc. Applied Physics is a four year degree program designed such that the graduating candidates will acquire the following skills. Designing, manufacturing, handling and using renewable energy technologies. Selecting, handling, testing and using materials for various applications. Describing various physical processes. Doing and reporting experimental activities various experiments in Physics. Solving physical problems. It is anticipated that graduates will acquire innovative skills in handling and using various kinds of materials for industrial use. They will also be innovative in the application of renewable energies. In general graduates will knowledge and understanding, intellectual, practical and transferable skills necessary for the analysis and synthesis of problems related to materials and renewable energies. This will be acquired through a combination of lectures, practical experiments, project research, case studies and industrial practical training.

 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

For admission into the Applied Physics degree programme, a minimum of two principal passes in Mathematics and Physics at Secondary School Advanced level is needed from any of the A-level combination.

Government sponsored students are selected by the Rwanda National Examinations Council. Privately sponsored students should apply directly to the Institute's office of the Registrar.

Information on fees and other admission requirements can be obtained from www.admissions.ur.ac.rw

 

PROGRAMME CONTENT

Year 1: General English, Mechanics, Linear Algebra I, Calculus I, Study Skills, International Computer Driving License, General chemistry, Linear Algebra II, Calculus II, Electricity and Magnetism I, Properties of Matter, Physics Chemistry I, Computer programming.

Year 2: English for science and technology, Ordinary Partial differential Equations, Numerical Analysis I, Wave and Vibrations, Geometrical Optics, Electricity and Magnetism II, Heat and Thermodynamics, Probability and Statistics, Physical Optics, Analogue Electronics, Mathematical Physics I, Classical Mechanics, Quantum Mechanics I.

Year 3: English forAcademic Purpose , Electrodynamics, Quantum mechanics II, Solid state physics, Mathematical Physics II, Semiconductor Physics, Statistical Physics, Atomic and Molecular Physics, AC circuit theory, computational Physics, Digital Electronics, Introduction to Environmental Physics.

Year 4:

Renewable Energy option.

Measurement and Instrumentation, Plasma Physics, Special Relativity, Solar Thermal and Photovoltaics, Remote Sensing and GIS, Hydro, Geothermal and Tidal energy, Entrepreneurship Development, Research Project.

Material Science Option.

Measurement and Instrumentation, Plasma Physics Special relativity, Introduction to material Science, Electrical Engineering materials, Entrepreneurship, Non destructive testing of materials, Ceramics and Glass, Composite materials, Polymer Physics , Research Project.

 

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

In the course of Physics Programme, students will develop programme-specific skills. Students will work with critical understanding of both principal and specialist theories, principles and concepts so that on completing the programme they should be able to demonstrate to a large extent the undergraduate attributes outlined below:

A. Knowledge and Understanding

At the end of the programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

A1. The core theories and principles of the foundational modules in physics (classical mechanics, computational physics, electricity and magnetism, modern physics, waves and optics, and quantum mechanics) and the ability to integrate competently the knowledge and skills acquired in more advanced courses.

A2. How physics applies to phenomena in the world around them.

A3. The way observation, experiment and theory work together to continue to expand the frontiers of knowledge of the physical universe.

B. Cognitive/Intellectual skills/Application of Knowledge

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

B1. Apply basic mathematical tools commonly used in physics, including elementary probability theory, differential and integral calculus, vector calculus, ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, Fourier series and transforms, abstract linear algebra, and functions of a complex variable.

B2. Apply the basic laws of physics in the areas of classical mechanics, Newtonian gravitation, special relativity, electromagnetism, geometrical and physical optics, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and statistical mechanics.  

B3. Recognize how and when physics methods and principles can help address problems and then apply those methods and principles to solve more complex problems in advanced classes.

B4. Exercise the use of physical intuition, including the ability to guess an approximate or conceptual answer to a physics problem and recognize whether or not the result of a calculation makes physical sense.

B5. Critically assess their current state of knowledge and expertise, and develop, implement, and refine a plan to acquire new knowledge for specific scientific goals and in pursuit of new intellectual interests.

C. Communication/ICT/Numeracy/Analytic Techniques/Practical Skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

C1. Translate a physical description to a mathematical equation, and conversely, explain the physical meaning of the mathematics.

C2. Apply knowledge of mathematics, physics and modern computing tools in solving physical problems.

C3. Use classic experimental techniques and modern measurement technology, including analog electronics, computer data acquisition, laboratory test equipment, optics, lasers, and detectors.

C4. Communicate verbally, graphically, and/or in writing the results of theoretical calculations and laboratory experiments including distinguishing statistical and systematic errors, propagating errors, in a clear and concise manner that incorporates the stylistic conventions used by physicists worldwide.

C5. Use the appropriate tools and requisite media literacy to acquire, assess information on a topic, and analyze data and information from diverse sources, and be able to learn new things on one’s own.

C6. Convert a physical situation articulated in a text to a mathematical formulation, and then analyze it quantitatively.

C7. Organize and carry out long, complex physics problems, articulate expectations for, and justify reasonableness of solutions.

C8. State strategy/model and assumptions, and demonstrate an awareness of what constitutes sufficient evidence or proof. 3

C9. Complete an experimental, computational or theoretical research project under the guidance of faculty and report on this project in writing and orally to an audience of peers and faculty.

D. General transferable skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

D1. Demonstrate proficiency in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data.

D2. Demonstrate the ability to present clear, logical and succinct arguments, including writing style and mathematical language, and speak using professional norms.

D3. Demonstrate the ability to collaborate effectively and participate effectively in multidisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary teams.

D4. Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary issues necessary to understand the impact of scientific solutions in a global and societal context.

D5. Demonstrate the ability to use scientific skill acquired in constructive community service or engagement that recognizes the potential impact on local and global issues, including environmental impact and sustainability.

D6. Demonstrate the ability to succeed in realworld employment or further professional training, and to engage in life-long learning.

D7. Demonstrate personal and professional integrity in all professional aspects, including acting in an ethical manner with a sense of honesty and responsibility and understanding of intellectual property issues in conducting scientific research.

 

 

4. Department of Applied Mathematics

Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics

A student completing the Applied Mathematics programmes will have an understanding of mathematical, statistical, and operations research principles, and is equipped with the necessary skills, knowledge and scientific attitudes required for solving a wide variety of mathematical, statistical and operations research problems (including those in science, engineering, technology, finance and commerce) at various levels of complexity theoretically and practically using computing. The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes: Student should know and be able to apply a selection of mathematical and computational tools required to solve and understand problems in quantitative science, identifying relevant principles and laws when dealing with such problems; plan, conduct and report (orally and in writing) on a programme of investigation; integrate and evaluate information from a variety of sources; develop skills in extracting relevant information from published sources, both printed and electronic, and the ability to reference work in an appropriate manner, is expected to have an ability to execute experiments in an experimental or computing laboratory with due safety precautions; have basic familiarity and competence in handling laboratory apparatus or computers; have competence in the use of mathematical methods and techniques in problem solving and modelling; use numerical and analytical techniques to solve problems.

 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Eligible candidates must have passed in the Rwandan Senior school level or other equivalent finishing examinations and attained a minimum grade B in the subjects of Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics. From different combinations: Physics - Chemistry – Mathematics; Mathematics-Physics-Geography or Mathematics-Physics-Computer.

Government sponsored students are selected by the Rwanda National Examinations Council. Privately sponsored students should apply directly to the Registrar's Office.

Information on fees and other admission requirements can be obtained from www.admissions.ur.ac.rw

 

PROGRAMME CONTENT

Year 1: General English,Mechanics, Linear Algebra I, Calculus I, Study Skills, International Computer Driving Licence (ICDL), General Chemistry, Linear Algebra II, Calculus II, Electricity & Magnetism , Properties of Matter, Discrete Mathematics, C Programming.

Year 2: English forScience and Technology, Ordinary Differential Equations, Numerical Analysis I, Probability & Statistics, Number Theory, Analytical Geometry, Real Analysis, Partial Differential Equations, Vector Analysis, Numerical Analysis II, Classical Mechanics, C++ Programming, Functions of Several Variables.

Year 3: English for academic Purposes, Graph Theory, General Topology, Financial Mathematics, Linear Programming, Group Theory, Java Programming, Mathematical Modelling, Group Theory, Java Programming, Mathematical Modelling, Operations Research, Regression Analysis, Nonlinear Analysis, Complex Analysis, Integral Transforms.

Year 4 (Statistics): Entrepreneurship skills, Statistical Methods of data Analysis, Time Series Analysis & Forecasting, Econometrics, Industrial Attachment (10 weeks), Project Work, Sampling Theory & Methods, Experimental Design, Differential Geometry, Algorithm Design & Analysis.

Year 4 (Dynamical Systems): Entrepreneurship skills, Nonlinear Dynamical Systems, Fluid Dynamics I, Celestial Mechanics, Industrial Attachment (10 weeks), Project work, Chaos in Nonlinear Dynamical Systems, Fluid Dynamics II, Differential Geometry, Algorithm Design & Analysis.

Year 4 (Pure Mathematics): Entrepreneurship skills, Computational Complex Analysis, Field Theory, Ring Theory, Ring Theory, Industrial Attachment (10 weeks), Project Work, Algebra Number Theory, Commutative Algebra, Differential Geometry, Algorithm Design & Analysis.

 

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

A. Knowledge and Understanding

At the end of the programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

A1. Modules related to pure mathematics;

A2. Modules related to applied mathematics

A3. Modules related to Statistics

A4. Modules related to Computations

B. Cognitive/Intellectual skills/Application of Knowledge

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

B1. Apply calculus, geometry and algebra to solve problems;

B2. Apply Differential Equations to solve problems problems;

B3. Apply statistics to solve real life situation problems;

B4. Apply numerical  methods in solving problems;

C. Communication/ICT/Numeracy/Analytic Techniques/Practical Skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

C1. Apply fundamental notions of mathematics in solving real life problems

C3. Learn mathematical computing skills using modern software such as Matlab and R;

C4. Write a report on mathematical analysis of data;

C5. Use IT skills in major research and commercial statistical packages;

D. General transferable skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

D1. Translate question of interest into mathematical hypotheses;

D2. Display and analyse data for specific research questions;

D3. Work as a mathematician expert in multi-professional work communities.

 

5. Department of Geography

 

 
CONTACT US

UR - CST, Avenue de l'Armee

P. O. Box 3900 Kigali-Rwanda

Call: +250 (0) 788 469314  

Email: principal .cst@ur.ac.rw